MOORHEAD – Twenty-three years ago, the prognosis for Kent Wright graduating from college – let alone his odds at medical school – did not seem particularly good.

By: Marino Eccher, INFORUM

MOORHEAD – Twenty-three years ago, the prognosis for Kent Wright graduating from college – let alone his odds at medical school – did not seem particularly good.

He first enrolled at Minnesota State University Moorhead (Moorhead State at the time) in 1988 as a pre-veterinary student, but he lasted just two years.

Class, he said, was not a high priority.

“My academic career was a victim of my social life,” he said. “Too much partying on the mind, I guess.”

So he quit and spent the next two decades running the family dairy farm near Sebeka. He always liked science – and even learned to do embryo transplants on his own cows – but going back to school seemed like too scary and dramatic of a step.

That changed in 2009, when the bottom fell out of the dairy market and Wright found himself selling milk for less money than his father sold it 30 years earlier. With the industry making the future uncertain, Wright and his wife, Heidi, figured the timing would never be better to take the leap.

“We felt if we were ever going to make a change, it had to be right now,” Heidi Wright said.

Today, Kent, now 43, will graduate from MSUM with a degree in biology. Instead of picking up his veterinary studies, he’s taking his family to Dominica in the Caribbean, where he’ll enroll in Ross University’s medical school.

The change in direction was prompted by his family’s experiences with a fertility doctor a decade ago, who helped him and his wife have two children.

“Everything I was doing with the cattle seemed important up to that time,” he said. “All the cattle embryos in the world could never create the kind of emotion that one doctor did for us.”

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